Watch the 2019 DEA Memorial Service

The DEA Memorial service is held every year in May during National Police Week. The service pays tribute to the men and women of DEA and its predecessor agencies who have lost their lives while on duty. They have made the ultimate sacrifice for drug law enforcement and for our country. Watch now »

Learn more about the DEA Wall of Honor »

2019 DEA Memorial Service

The DEA Memorial service is held every year in May during National Police Week. The service pays tribute to the men and women of DEA and its predecessor agencies who have lost their lives while on duty. They have made the ultimate sacrifice for drug law enforcement and for our country.

Learn more about the DEA Wall of Honor »

Webcast Replay – Who We Are and What We Do: Forensics

Take a peek into the inner workings of the Drug Enforcement Administration in our 2019 lecture series “Who We Are and What We Do.” Join Elizabeth L. Maurer, Curator of Education for the DEA Museum at a panel discussion with members of the Forensics staff from around the country.

The mission of the Drug Enforcement Administration’s Office of Forensic Sciences is to provide quality scientific, technical, and administrative support to the law enforcement and intelligence communities and to the criminal justice system at large, to assist with the enforcement of controlled substance laws and regulations of the United States. There are three different disciplines within the Forensic Sciences division: Chemistry, Fingerprints, and Digital Evidence.

Watch the replay »

DEA warns of alarming increase of scam calls

WASHINGTON – The Drug Enforcement Administration urges its DEA-registered practitioners and members of the public to be cautious of telephone calls from criminals posing as DEA or other law enforcement personnel threatening arrest and prosecution for supposed violations of federal drug laws or involvement in drug-trafficking activities.

DEA continues to receive reports from practitioners and the general public, alike, indicating that they have received calls threatening legal action if an exorbitant fine is not paid immediately over the phone. The callers typically identify themselves as DEA personnel and instruct their victims to pay the “fine” via wire transfer to avoid arrest, prosecution, and imprisonment.

The reported scam tactics are continually changing, but often share many of the following characteristics:

  • Callers use fake names and badge numbers or, alternatively, names of well-known DEA senior officials.
  • The tone of calls is urgent and aggressive; callers refuse to speak or leave a message with anyone other than the person for whom they are calling.
  • Callers threaten arrest, prosecution, and imprisonment, and in the case of medical practitioners, revocation of their DEA numbers.
  • Callers demand thousands of dollars via wire transfer or, in some instances, in the form of untraceable gift cards taken over the phone.
  • Callers falsify the number on caller ID to appear as a legitimate DEA phone number.
  • Callers will often ask for personal information, such as social security number or date of birth.
  • When calling a medical practitioner, callers often reference National Provider Identifier numbers and/or state license numbers. They also might claim that patients are making accusations against the practitioner.

It’s important to underscore that DEA personnel will never contact practitioners or members of the public by telephone to demand money or any other form of payment. DEA will not request any personal or sensitive information over the phone. Notification of a legitimate investigation or legal action is made via official letter or in person.

Impersonating a federal agent is a violation of federal law.

Anyone receiving a telephone call from a person purporting to be a DEA special agent or other law enforcement official seeking money should refuse the demand and report the threat using the online form or by calling 877-792-2873. Reporting scam calls will greatly assist DEA in investigating and stopping this criminal activity. Any urgent concerns or questions, including inquiring about legitimate investigations, should be directed to the local DEA field division.

To report scam activity online, visit the DEA Diversion on line reporting page.

For contact information for DEA field divisions, visit the domestic division page on DEA.gov.

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Contact: National Media Affairs Office
Phone Number: (202) 307-7977
Original Press Release

Who We Are and What We Do: Intelligence

Who We Are and What We Do: Intelligence, March 5, 2019, 11-11:45am EST, DEA Auditorium, DEA Museum Lecture SeriesOn March 5, 2019, take a peek into the inner workings of the Drug Enforcement Administration in our 2019 lecture series “Who We Are and What We Do.” Join Elizabeth L. Maurer, Curator of Education for the DEA Museum at a panel discussion with 4 members of the Intelligence staff stationed at Headquarters. Aaron Hurwitz, Intelligence Research Specialist; Kia M. Pratt, Intelligence Staff Coordinator; Carrie N. Thompson, Executive Assistant to the Chief of Intelligence; and William N. Trull, Intelligence Research Specialist will lend their expertise and discuss their respective roles in the Intelligence Division of the DEA. Together, they have over 40 years of experience with the DEA. Learn how they came to work at the DEA, their current roles in the agency, and their day to day activities on the job.

Learn More

Webcast Replay – From Addiction to Zig-Zag and Everything in Between: Artifacts from the DEA Museum Collection

On October 30, 2018, the DEA Museum will host an interactive discussion on “From Addiction to Zig-Zag and Everything in Between: Artifacts from the DEA Museum Collection.”

Image: Experience Artifacts from the DEA Museum Collection, From Addiction to Zig-Zag and Everything in Between: Artifacts from the DEA Museum CollectionDrug misuse, addiction, and rising numbers of drug overdose deaths affect millions of Americans daily. Understanding the history, causes, and consequences of addiction helps the public to better understand the problem as well as proposed solutions.

The Drug Enforcement Administration Museum’s collection of nearly 5,000 artifacts documents the history of drug policy, drug law enforcement, drug addiction, and drug education in the United States. Museum programs, exhibits, and educational outreach support the DEA’s mission to enforce controlled substances laws and regulations of the United States and reduce the use and availability of illicit controlled substances. Watch Now »

Webcast Replay – Opioids and Heroin: A New Look at Some Old (and Not So Old) Drugs

Watch the webcast replay of the DEA Museum Lecture Series panel discussion on “Opioids and Heroin: A New Look at Some Old (and Not So Old) Drugs.”

Drug overdoses are now the leading cause of injury-related death in the United States, eclipsing deaths from motor vehicle crashes or firearms. Opioids & Heroin: A New Look at Some Old (and Not So Old) DrugsAccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there were nearly 64,000 overdose deaths in 2016, or approximately 174 per day. Over 42,249 (66 percent) of these deaths involved opioids. CDC’s preliminary data estimates more than 74,000 drug overdose deaths in 2017.

Experts in the opioid epidemic and the heroin threat will discuss the crisis of opioid addiction and overdose. This event is free and open to the public.

Watch Now »

 

 

Opioids and Heroin: A New Look at Some Old (and Not So Old) Drugs

On September 18, 2018 the DEA Museum will host a panel discussion on “Opioids and Heroin: A New Look at Some Old (and Not So Old) Drugs.”

Drug overdoses are now the leading cause of injury-related death in the United States, eclipsing deaths from motor vehicle crashes or firearms. Opioids & Heroin: A New Look at Some Old (and Not So Old) DrugsAccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there were nearly 64,000 overdose deaths in 2016, or approximately 174 per day. Over 42,249 (66 percent) of these deaths involved opioids. CDC’s preliminary data estimates more than 74,000 drug overdose deaths in 2017.

Experts in the opioid epidemic and the heroin threat will discuss the crisis of opioid addiction and overdose. This event is free and open to the public.

Learn more »

 

 

Museum Hours Extended to Saturdays

The DEA Museum & Visitors Center is proud to announce Saturday hours begin June 2. We will be open on Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free. We look forward to seeing you!